"Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female remains were identified by their oval brooches, and not much else.) By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons. It’s been so difficult for people to envision women’s historical contributions as solely getting married and dying in childbirth, but you can’t argue with numbers—and fifty/fifty is pretty damn good. The presence of female warriors also has researchers now wondering just how accurate the stereotypes of raping and pillaging actually are: Women may have accompanied male Vikings in those early invasions of England, in much greater numbers than scholars earlier supposed, (Researcher) McLeod concludes. Rather than the ravaging rovers of legend, the Vikings arrived as marriage-minded colonists."
- Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female

COOOOOOOL (via clambistro)

(via liberty1776)

vikings archaelogy corpses gender

usagov:

Image description:
From the National Archives:

World War II Begins Seventy Five Years Ago:

Bedside Note of President Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding the Invasion of Poland by Germany, 09/01/1939

In the early morning of September 1, 1939, German tanks crossed the German-Polish border—sparking World War II. Five hours later, at 3:05 A.M. local time, President Franklin D. Roosevelt received a phone call from Ambassador William C. Bullitt in Paris, who relayed the news from Ambassador Anthony Biddle in Warsaw. After notifying the military, FDR jotted down this bedside note.
via DocsTeach

usagov:

Image description:

From the National Archives:

World War II Begins Seventy Five Years Ago:

Bedside Note of President Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding the Invasion of Poland by Germany, 09/01/1939

In the early morning of September 1, 1939, German tanks crossed the German-Polish border—sparking World War II. Five hours later, at 3:05 A.M. local time, President Franklin D. Roosevelt received a phone call from Ambassador William C. Bullitt in Paris, who relayed the news from Ambassador Anthony Biddle in Warsaw. After notifying the military, FDR jotted down this bedside note.

via DocsTeach

world war two franklin delano roosevelt fdr potus us presidents ww2 wwii invasion of poland germany

"Before deciding librarianship is right for you, make sure you understand what today’s librarians do all day. If you want quiet and lots of time to read, think again. Today’s libraries are full of collegial, and sometimes even downright noisy, collaboration, creation, and community activities, and are as much about technology as print on paper."
-

Meredith Schwartz’s “How To Be a 21st Century Librarian,” from Library Journal. A fantastic, digestible overview of the profession and absolute required reading for those researching MLS/MLIS programs.

It reminds me that I need to write my “Why I Didn’t Go to Library School” post.

(via cloudunbound)

this is why i DID (and DO) want to be a librarian!

(via sslibrarianship)

(via thatblondelibrarian)

librarian mls mlis libraries

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1860-90s, [tintype portrait of ice man, posed with their tools]
via Cowan’s Auctions
Happy Labor Day, everyone! For those of you working today, find some solace in these occupational portraits of men and women who have toiled before you. Those who are lucky enough to be granted a reprieve from your job, seriously thank those workers you come into contact with today, and continue to honor the American work ethic.

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1860-90s, [tintype portrait of ice man, posed with their tools]

via Cowan’s Auctions

Happy Labor Day, everyone! For those of you working today, find some solace in these occupational portraits of men and women who have toiled before you. Those who are lucky enough to be granted a reprieve from your job, seriously thank those workers you come into contact with today, and continue to honor the American work ethic.

labor day occupational portraits photojournalism american history us history

minutemanworld:

"Elegy for General Wolfe", written by Thomas Paine in 1775. The poem celebrates the Battle of Quebec which was fought on September 13, 1759. This particular copy was written down in a small note book used for things such as recipes, songs, poems, and other miscellany. 

In a mouldering cave where the wretched retreat, Britannia sat wasted with care; She mourned for her Wolfe, and exclaim’d against fate And gave herself up to despair. The walls of her cell she had sculptured around With the feats of her favorite son; And even the dust, as it lay on the ground, Was engraved with the deeds he had done. The sire of the Gods, from his crystalline throne, Beheld the disconsolate dame, And moved with her tears, he sent Mercury down, And these were the tidings that came: "Britannia forbear, not a sigh nor a tear For thy Wolfe so deservedly loved, Your tears shall be changed into triumphs of joy, For thy Wolfe is not dead but removed. "The sons of the East, the proud giants of old. Have crept from their darksome abodes, And this is the news as in Heaven it was told, They were marching to war with the Gods; A Council was held in the chambers of Jove, And this was their final decree, That Wolfe should be called to the armies above, And the charge was intrusted to me. "To the plains of Quebec with the orders I flew, He begg’d for a moment’s delay; He cry’d ‘Oh! forbear, let me victory hear, And then thy command I’ll obey.’ With a darksome thick film I encompass’d his eyes, And bore him away in an urn, Lest the fondness he bore to his own native shore, Should induce him again to return.”

minutemanworld:

"Elegy for General Wolfe", written by Thomas Paine in 1775. The poem celebrates the Battle of Quebec which was fought on September 13, 1759. This particular copy was written down in a small note book used for things such as recipes, songs, poems, and other miscellany. 

In a mouldering cave where the wretched retreat, 
Britannia sat wasted with care; 
She mourned for her Wolfe, and exclaim’d against fate 
And gave herself up to despair. 
The walls of her cell she had sculptured around 
With the feats of her favorite son; 
And even the dust, as it lay on the ground, 
Was engraved with the deeds he had done. 

The sire of the Gods, from his crystalline throne, 
Beheld the disconsolate dame, 
And moved with her tears, he sent Mercury down, 
And these were the tidings that came: 
"Britannia forbear, not a sigh nor a tear 
For thy Wolfe so deservedly loved, 
Your tears shall be changed into triumphs of joy, 
For thy Wolfe is not dead but removed. 

"The sons of the East, the proud giants of old. 
Have crept from their darksome abodes, 
And this is the news as in Heaven it was told, 
They were marching to war with the Gods; 
A Council was held in the chambers of Jove, 
And this was their final decree, 
That Wolfe should be called to the armies above, 
And the charge was intrusted to me. 

"To the plains of Quebec with the orders I flew, 
He begg’d for a moment’s delay; 
He cry’d ‘Oh! forbear, let me victory hear, 
And then thy command I’ll obey.’ 
With a darksome thick film I encompass’d his eyes, 
And bore him away in an urn, 
Lest the fondness he bore to his own native shore, 
Should induce him again to return.”

(Source: timeline.americanrevolutioncenter.org, via haleofyale)

minutemanworld elegy for general wolfe thomas paine battle of quebec 18th century handwritten

pbsthisdayinhistory:

September 1899: 15-year old Eleanor Roosevelt Attends Allenswood School in London
This month in 1899, Eleanor Roosevelt’s grandmother sent 15-year-old Eleanor to Allenswood School, an exclusive academy near London, to be formally educated.  Up until this point, Eleanor had been instructed privately at home. Eleanor wrote fondly of her time at Allenswood and its headmistress, Marie Souvestre, describing the experience as the “happiest of my life.”
Learn more about all the Roosevelts with preview videos from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
(1) Eleanor Roosevelt at Mademoiselle Marie Souvestre’s Allenswood School, South Fields, England, c.1900. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library (2) Wikimedia Commons

pbsthisdayinhistory:

September 1899: 15-year old Eleanor Roosevelt Attends Allenswood School in London

This month in 1899, Eleanor Roosevelt’s grandmother sent 15-year-old Eleanor to Allenswood School, an exclusive academy near London, to be formally educated.  Up until this point, Eleanor had been instructed privately at home. Eleanor wrote fondly of her time at Allenswood and its headmistress, Marie Souvestre, describing the experience as the “happiest of my life.”

Learn more about all the Roosevelts with preview videos from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

(1) Eleanor Roosevelt at Mademoiselle Marie Souvestre’s Allenswood School, South Fields, England, c.1900. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library (2) Wikimedia Commons

eleanor roosevelt the roosevelts ken burns FLOTUS first ladies us history

"I’ve written about this before, and it comes down to one line: Confusion is the sweat of learning. If a student doesn’t get confused at some point in a class then either the student already knew the material in class, or the student didn’t learn anything in class. It’s just like going to a gym to work out. If you didn’t sweat and you didn’t get sore afterwards, you probably didn’t do anything."
- Two Common Misconceptions About Learning | WIRED (via teachnologies)

(via girlwithalessonplan)

learning teaching reference

saucefactory:

queelez:

lord-of-the-nerds:

discordion:

When he was 2 years old, he fell out of a second story window and fractured his skull
When he was 6 years old, he mistakenly drank boric acid.
When he was 9 years old, he fell over a small cliff and broke his leg.
When he was 11 years old, he contracted measles and was in a coma for nine days.
When he was 14 years old, he broke his arm when he caught it in a carriage door.
When he was 19 years old, he was struck on the head by a falling brick.
When he was 23 years old, he almost died from the effects of tainted wine.
When he was 29 years old, Adolph Sax invented the saxophone.

clearly someone didn’t want that saxophone invented 

#incompetent time-travelling saxophone haters

THIS NEEDS TO BE A 300-PAGE SCI-FI NOVEL BECAUSE I WOULD READ THE HELL OUTTA THAT

saucefactory:

queelez:

lord-of-the-nerds:

discordion:

When he was 2 years old, he fell out of a second story window and fractured his skull

When he was 6 years old, he mistakenly drank boric acid.

When he was 9 years old, he fell over a small cliff and broke his leg.

When he was 11 years old, he contracted measles and was in a coma for nine days.

When he was 14 years old, he broke his arm when he caught it in a carriage door.

When he was 19 years old, he was struck on the head by a falling brick.

When he was 23 years old, he almost died from the effects of tainted wine.

When he was 29 years old, Adolph Sax invented the saxophone.

clearly someone didn’t want that saxophone invented 

#incompetent time-travelling saxophone haters

THIS NEEDS TO BE A 300-PAGE SCI-FI NOVEL BECAUSE I WOULD READ THE HELL OUTTA THAT

(via timetravelingimpala)

funny adolph sax

18th century brewery remains found at Va. college

archiving-a-life:

archaeologicalnews:

College students have always had a taste for beer, and archaeologists have uncovered new evidence at the College of William and Mary to prove it.

The remains of what is likely an 18th century on-campus brewery were discovered just outside of the nation’s oldest college building when campus officials were looking to widen a sidewalk.

School officials say the discovery near the Wren Building will allow them to tell a broader story about campus life in the Colonial era that involved the interaction of slaves, Native Americans, faculty and students.

Major excavation of the site wrapped up on Friday, and archaeologists now plan to perform a detailed lab analysis on some of what they’ve found. That includes searching for pollen in hopes that would’ve been used to make beer. (source)

My kind of history.  I only wish I’d known about this a couple semesters ago for my American Taverns paper.

college of william and mary archaeologicalnews

tiny-librarian:

 “Poor little girl, you are not what was desired, but you are no less dear to me on that account. A son would have been the property of the state. You shall be mine; you shall have my undivided care; you will share all my happinesses and you will alleviate my sufferings…”

tiny-librarian:

“Poor little girl, you are not what was desired, but you are no less dear to me on that account. A son would have been the property of the state. You shall be mine; you shall have my undivided care; you will share all my happinesses and you will alleviate my sufferings…”

movie marie antoinette

thedoctorheretohelp:

but okay my biggest history crush

empress theodora of byzantium

she was the wife of justinian the first who was famous and stuff, mostly for letting some people make law codes and then taking the credit for them

but theodora

woah

so before she married justinian, theodora was a prostitute and an actress

history spoiler alert: being an actress was not nearly the gossip-mag people-influencing position that it is today

justinian saw her and heard her talk and be all witty and intelligent and interesting and great and, like maya, said WOAH but he couldn’t marry her because he was the heir to the throne and she was an actress

but then the person who was actually on the throne at the time died and justinian was like YEAH I’M IN LOVE WITH YOU YOU ARE SO GREAT PLEASE BE EMPRESS so she said ok cool

and they did leading-an-empire-y sort of things for a while and theodora was a champion of women’s rights and rights for lower class people- she outlawed forced prostitution, gave women more property rights and divorce rights, instituted the death penalty for rape, and made it illegal to kill a wife who had committed adultery

but then some unrest started to develop in byzantium, as unrest tends to, and these rival political factions, the blues and the greens, started to fight

basically they were rival sports teams and they were super mad about the outcome of a specific chariot race, so they started to fight in the arena, but then someone got the brilliant idea to basically just destroy everything especially the emperor and everything he stood for

so justinian, who did not much want to be destroyed, was like NO and decided to run away so he wouldn’t die

but theodora was like HEY. HEY HUSBAND DUDE, SERIOUSLY, IF WE LEAVE NOW WE LOSE EVERYTHING THAT WE’VE DONE AND THE CITY FALLS TO PIECES AND EVERYTHING WILL JUST SUCK A LOT FOR EVERYTHING and he was like BUT I DON’T WANT TO DIE???? and she was like SUCK IT UP. IF YOU STAY THERE’S A CHANCE THAT WE CAN FIX THINGS AND IF YOU LEAVE THEN WE DON’T HAVE ANY HOPE AT ALL and he was like BUT I REALLY DON’T WANT TO DIE and she said OK WELL FINE LEAVE BUT I’M NOT GOING WITH YOU THEN and he said NO I DON’T WANT TO LEAVE YOU and she said WELL THEN STAY AND DEFEND YOUR CITY AND YOUR PEOPLE, HUBBY

and he did and it was awesome

except it wasn’t awesome because a lot of people died but theodora was awesome

empress theodora theodora justinian women history