History Major at UMass Amherst. Incurable reader. Proud travel lover. Devoted assistant. Passionate web scholar. Prone to fits of apathy.
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amnhnyc:

On July 20, 1969, with 600 million people watching on TV, an American crew landed on the Moon—the first people ever to walk on another world. The Apollo 11 mission had three crew members: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, who piloted the craft that would return them to Earth, while the others became the first two men ever to walk its surface.

Learn more about this historic event

Reblogged from pbsthisdayinhistory  574 notes
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 21, 1925: Scopes Found Guilty in “Monkey Trial”
On this day in 1925, a Tennessee high school science teacher, John Thomas Scopes, was found guilty for allegedly teaching evolution, which violated Tennessee state law. The Scopes Trial, known as the “Monkey Trial,” lasted only a week, but ignited conversation and debate over whether to teach Creation or Evolution in the classroom. 
The court acquitted Scopes on a technicality but upheld the constitutionality of the state law which was eventually overturned in 1967.
Explore American Experience’s timeline of the Scopes “Monkey” Trial to learn more.
Image:  John Thomas Scopes, Library of Congress.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 21, 1925: Scopes Found Guilty in “Monkey Trial”

On this day in 1925, a Tennessee high school science teacher, John Thomas Scopes, was found guilty for allegedly teaching evolution, which violated Tennessee state law. The Scopes Trial, known as the “Monkey Trial,” lasted only a week, but ignited conversation and debate over whether to teach Creation or Evolution in the classroom.

The court acquitted Scopes on a technicality but upheld the constitutionality of the state law which was eventually overturned in 1967.

Explore American Experience’s timeline of the Scopes “Monkey” Trial to learn more.

Image:  John Thomas Scopes, Library of Congress.

Reblogged from deadpresidents  16 notes
Who do you think was the strangest President in terms of personality and in terms of being suited for the job?
Anonymous

deadpresidents:

The strangest President personality-wise was probably Calvin Coolidge. I’ve written a couple of essays about his eccentricities, unorthodox personal qualities, and unique leadership style — "I Thought I Could Swing It: The Strange Life and Presidency of Calvin Coolidge" and "I feel like I no longer fit in with these times". Readers interested in Coolidge’s odd personality should check out both of those essays.

As for the Presidents who were least suited to do the job, in most cases those Presidents entered office with better resumes than anyone else serving in the Executive Branch. On paper, Presidents like John Quincy Adams, Martin Van Buren, James K. Polk, James Buchanan, and William Howard Taft seemingly had more experience in more important positions than nearly all of their predecessors and successors. Unfortunately, you can’t govern a nation on paper or potential, and those highly-qualified leaders found that their personalities were not suited for the job of President of the United States.