congressarchives:

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

Rhode Island’s path to ratifying the Constitution was a bumpy one. After rejecting the Constitution numerous times, the United Sates gave Rhode Island a deadline of January 15, 1790 to either call a new ratifying convention or have it’s exports to the U.S. taxed as foreign goods.

On September 26, 1789, President George Washington forwarded this message from Rhode Island’s Governor John Collins explaining Rhode Island’s hesitancy over ratifying the Constitution. The January deadline was postponed after Congress received a second letter which outlined plans for a ratifying convention in March 1790. The convention adjourned without taking a ratification vote, and Congress again considered legislation to treat Rhode Island as a foreign state.

On May 29, Rhode Island finally ratified the Constitution. They included with their ratification a list of 18 human rights and 21 proposed amendments. Most of the 21 amendments were included in the Bill of Rights passed by Congress and sent to the states for adoption. On June 30, Rhode Island passed all 12 of the proposed amendments, though only amendments 3 through 12 would be adopted as the first 10 amendments to the Constitution.

Message from President George Washington Enclosing a Letter from Rhode Island Governor John Collins, 9/26/1789, Sen 1A-E2, Records of the U.S. Senate

(via allabouthistory76)

ri history congressarchives us congress constitution us history new england george washington

hyyy-errr:

rxdicvl:

dichotomization:

On June 11th 1963, Thích Quảng Đức, a Vietnamese Buddhist monk, sat down in the middle of a busy intersection in Saigon, covered himself in gasoline and he then ignited a match, and set himself on fire. Đức burned to death in a matter of minutes, and he was immortalized in a famous photograph taken by a reporter who was in Vietnam in order to photograph the war. All those who saw this spectacle were taken by the fact that Duc did not make a sound while burning to death. Đức was protesting President Ngô Đình Diệm’s administration for oppressing the Buddhist religion.

holy shit. 

I was waiting for this to come up on my dash. You also can’t forget that his whole body burned, but his heart remained intact and did not burn.

hyyy-errr:

rxdicvl:

dichotomization:

On June 11th 1963, Thích Quảng Đức, a Vietnamese Buddhist monk, sat down in the middle of a busy intersection in Saigon, covered himself in gasoline and he then ignited a match, and set himself on fire. Đức burned to death in a matter of minutes, and he was immortalized in a famous photograph taken by a reporter who was in Vietnam in order to photograph the war. All those who saw this spectacle were taken by the fact that Duc did not make a sound while burning to death. Đức was protesting President Ngô Đình Diệm’s administration for oppressing the Buddhist religion.

holy shit. 

I was waiting for this to come up on my dash. You also can’t forget that his whole body burned, but his heart remained intact and did not burn.

(via tir-nanog)

buddhism gift Thích Quảng Đức vietnam queue

cakeykasey:

As a history major my concentration is European history and I have never enjoyed studying American history.. studying American history makes me really sad. This Foreign Policy class is killing me. I feel like as Americans we have such little culture, or tradition of our own. Most of our history is war, money, power and overcoming different forms of hate. Not to say other countries don’t deal with the same issues, but our history is saturated with it.

CakeyKasey history history major problems american history us history queue

Public History: My Experience With Numen

So in my public history a few weeks back, we were discussing how we as students have interacted with public history. The professor encouraged us to share our own experiences with museums - something fun, something different, something that made history come alive.

I have a lot of memories that I could share about museums - I mean, I’ve been on plenty of family vacations and adventures of my own where I’ve been surprised or excited or learned something new at a museum. But there is one moment in particular that I remembered as different than the others - and though I didn’t share it in class, I’d like to share it here. 

Read More

personal my work public history museums british museum vacations vacation

diasporadash:

Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age
In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the canefields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In Radical Moves, Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century.From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or “jazzing,” writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created—from Marcus Garvey’s UNIA to “regge” dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis’s worldwide fandom—still echoes in the present.
This looks official. 

diasporadash:

Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age

In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the canefields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In Radical Moves, Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century.
From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or “jazzing,” writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created—from Marcus Garvey’s UNIA to “regge” dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis’s worldwide fandom—still echoes in the present.

This looks official. 

(Source: diasporadash, via diasporicroots)

books african American history jazz black history queue

diasporicroots:

The world map and Eurocentrism - Gall- Peters Projection ( From “The West Wing” Season 2 Episode 16) 

What is Eurocentrism?

Eurocentrism is thoughts or practices privileging European identity, culture, and historical events over those of other regions. Implicit in Eurocentric practice is the claim that European culture and peoples are superior to those of other continents. This is very evident in the “Great Books” educational tradition, the distortion often conceals a dangerous denial of the origins of European culture and ideas in African and Asian traditions.

How may this affect maps?

The traditional “Mercator Projection Map” that we all learned about in school has a cultural and ethnic bias because of the relative sizes of the land masses. For instance, Greenland and Africa are roughly the same size while in reality, Africa is 4x as large.

The Mercator Map

mercator_na_world_physical_wall_mural_lg

In the video the cartographers advocated the “Gall-Peters Projection” map  more accurately estimates the sizes of various the land masses. It is a extremely large difference that is intended to not only provide a more accurate map but also point out traditional Western bias to developing nations.

The Gall peters projection map

map-gall-peters

Neither map is 100% accurate in showing what the world looks like. The main problem is, you cannot accurately draw a flat map based upon spherical land masses.

In the last 20 seconds of the “West Wing” The cartographers advocated for an upside down view of the world map…..which unnerved the White House spokesperson.

30M WORLD2008_USD_p.eps

The question everyone should ask themselves is how much influence these subtle things like map projections have on our psychology, and through that, real effects on international society?

Click here for more:

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eliotss:

charles-hardin-holley:

A WWII soldiers photo-booth collection c.1942

 (swanjolras)

(via hippie-master-historian-deactiv)

ww2 soldiers queue

Marie Laveau, the Voodoo Queen

thenecromerchantsdebt:

image

In all of the mysterious and unique history of Old New Orleans, there are few individuals who can match the legendary status of Marie Laveau. Although she was born in the late 18th century (she lived from 1794 to 1881), there are people, often tourists, who visit her grave today and others who still claim to see her ghost. She was a hairdresser, a devout Catholic, a healer, a nurse, and above all, the most famous — or infamous — Voodoo Queen in the history of New Orleans. Her very name is synonymous with voodoo and witchcraft.

Voodoo, or Vodou, was originally a spiritual religion from Africa. It was brought with the slaves to the West Indies, especially to St. Domingue, which was later called Haiti, and then to New Orleans. As the religion traveled to New Orleans, it changed. From being mainly animism (or a nature/spirit religion) when in West Africa, it developed oddities, such as zombies, while in Haiti. Zombies were called “the living dead”, and it was believed these were people who had died but returned to life, more or less, as soulless beings who followed the will of a witch doctor. In reality, we now know that “zombies” were living humans who had been drugged and were under the psychological influence of a Voodoo Queen or Voodoo Doctor. The “power of suggestion” plus drugs from nature (sometimes derived from the puffer fish) were the real causes of zombiism in Haiti.

Read More

us history voodoo vodou Marie Laveau history New Orleans Louisiana NOLA women women of color people of color WoC PoC queue

medievalpoc:

Over 700 Jefferson County High School students are staging walkouts and protests over proposed changes to the Advanced Placement History curriculum. According to Colorado Public Radio:

Last week, a school board member proposed that advanced placement history classes be required to promote free enterprise and patriotism and be required to avoid classroom materials that encourage social strife or civil disobedience. Two high schools in Jefferson County closed Friday after dozens of teachers called in sick in protest.

According the online petition to be delivered to the School District:

Jeffco Public School Board has just proposed a change of curriculum stating that, “Materials should not encourage or condone civil disorder, social strife or disregard of the law. Instructional materials should present positive aspects of the United States and its heritage.”

This means that important parts of our history such as the Civil Rights Movement, Native American genocide, and slavery will not be taught in public schools. If these important lessons are not taught, children will not learn from them, and what will stop them from happening again? This is a severe form of censorship intended to keep the youth ignorant and easy to manipulate. I’m hoping to get enough signatures to prove that this is a public issue, so, please, if this is important to you, please sign. Do not let our youth grow up in ignorance; we all deserve the truth!

You can sign the petition here.

You can read more articles at The Denver Post, CBS Denver (with video), and Colorado Public Radio.

Thanks to theseacaptainsdaughter for dropping a link in my inbox.

(via ivegotapotofdirt)

history education perspective medievalpoc

museumofmodernerotica asked:

Maybe this is a crazy question, but how did Europeans know what Africans looked like? I know that some of the paintings here are of North Africans/Middle Easterners, but others clearly depict people born south of the Sahara. I've heard of Prester John but I never imagined that medieval Europeans were aware that Prester John would have had brown skin. Am I missing something?

She Is Historic Answer:

medievalpoc:

Like. There are a lot of things I could say here. But I’m just going to do my best to answer your question, and the answer is either very simple or very complicated, depending on your current point of view.

1. “They” knew what people with brown skin looked like because people with brown skin had been there literally THE ENTIRE TIME. Some (and father back, ALL) of “them” had brown skin themselves.

2. “People with Brown Skin” and “Europeans” are not separate and mutually exclusive groups.

3. No matter how far back you go, the mythical time that you’re looking for, when all-white, racially and culturally isolated Europe was “real”, will continue to recede from your grasp until it winkles out the like imaginary place it is.

We can just keep going back. In every area, from all walks of life, rich and poor, kings and peasants, artists and iconoclasts, before there were countries and continents, before there were white people.

Russia, 1899:

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Switzerland, c. 1800:  [fixed link here]

image

Netherlands, 1658:

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Poland, 1539:

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Germany, 1480s:

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Spain, 1420s:

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France, 1332:

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Scotland, England, France, 1280s:

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France, 1220s:

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England, 1178:

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Belgium, 1084:

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Greece, c. 1000:

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Spain, 850s:

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Throughout Europe, 800s-500s:

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England, c. 300 AD:

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Scotland, c. 100 AD:

image

image

Italy, 79 AD:

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Greece, 170 B.C.:

image

Greece, 300 B. C.:

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Greece, 400s B.C.

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Greece, 500s B.C.:

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Egypt, 1200s B.C.:

image

Crete (Minoan), 1600 B.C.:

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Crete (Minoan), early 2000s B.C.:

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Romania, 34,000 B.C.:

image

The time when “EVERYONE” in Europe was White does not exist. They knew what people with brown skin looked like because they were there. They knew what “Africans” looked like because they were there, and they weren’t “they”, they were us, or you. I think what you’re missing is something that never existed.

medievalpoc perspective history queue

pyraxis asked:

I pointed my own history prof to this blog a while back - not sure if he's seen it or what he'll think (it seems he would consider a blog an invalid resource, despite your BAMF-linking skillz), but I DID warn him about the butts, so hopefully that won't stop him from critical engagement with the source material :)

She Is Historic Answer:

medievalpoc:

I’ve noticed that various professors and other academics’ willingness to accept this blog itself  (my writing, specifically) as a source is proportional to whether or not they are willing to entertain its premise, or view it as some kind of personal attack or criticism. It depends on what kind of paper you’re writing-for literary criticism 100% acceptable, for social sciences acceptable depending on the point you’re making/supporting,

Barring that, all of my secondary sources are fine for any subject, and there’s also the primary sources. Say what you will about butts, but they’re 100% historically accurate butts. I recommend your prof read The Forbidden Bestsellers of Pre-Revolutionary France by Robert Darnton and perhaps gain some perspective before clutching pearls, so to speak.

academia sources pearl clutching Robert Darnton history criticism the forbidden best sellers of pre revolutionary france medievalpoc perspective France queue